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Celebrating new years and traditions around the globe

The New Year is a celebration for most countries all around the world. Traveling for new years and learning about all of the different kinds of traditions that this planet has to offer is one way to see the world come together for a common holiday.

Our first stop in the journey of celebrating the New Year around the world is South America. In some Latin American countries, it is believed that the color of your underwear worn on New Year’s Eve determines the luck you will have the next year. This is popular among celebrities and sports stars as they wear their bright colored underwear, with each color signifying different meanings. According to Travel and Leisure Magazine, this is a superstitious tradition is done every year by those who believe that the outcomes or their choice in underwear color will fulfill their wishes. Some meanings include: yellow equates to money and success, red equals passion and love, and white will bring peace and happiness.

Image labeled for reuse courtesy of Wiki media

Image labeled for reuse courtesy of Wiki media

For some countries the New Year is about getting rid of all the bad from the previous year to start the next year with a fresh plate. People in Scotland celebrate a ritual called Hogmanay which, among other things, includes singing, drinking and the use fire to burn their past memories.  Hogmanay  New Year’s Eve in Scotland is a bigger celebration than Christmas, which wasn’t recognized as an official holiday until 1974.

Image labeled for reuse courtesy of Flickr

Image labeled for reuse courtesy of Flickr

In Spain a New Years tradition is to engulf twelve grapes at the strike of midnight, this signifying that if all grapes are eaten then twelve lucky months lie ahead. A more intense and quiet approach to bring in the new year compared to other parts of the world yelling and screaming, and in some cases kissing when the new year finally arrives.

Germans call New Year’s Eve Silvester. Traditions around Silverster in Germany and France vary throughout the country as does the traditions of food consumed to celebrate the day.

image labeled for reuse courtesy of Wikimedia

image labeled for reuse courtesy of Wikimedia

The Japanese have celebrated New Year’s Eve since 1873 and it is called Shogatsu  and is an important holiday in Japan. Since each year is a separate time for the Japanese, they hold parties called Bonenkai parties. This translates to “year forgetting parties”. Traditions at these parties include decorating the house in certain fashions and serving foods, each with specific

significance.

Image labeled for reuse courtesy of Wiki Media

Image labeled for reuse courtesy of Wiki Media

New Year’s Eve in Australia is a big celebration and party, Australian’s listen for the twelve rings of the church bell and, once the final bell peals, they make noise with drums and cheer that is followed by hugs and kisses to those around.

New year’s  is a fun holiday to celebrate, bringing in the next year of life in all different ways and showing excitement for the next year that lies ahead and the unknown of what is to come. Although people around the world celebrate differently by tradition, they all celebrate the same thing – a change of year and a potential for a brand new start.

By: Allison Perkins

Hello I'm Allison! Being interested in travel and people from all over the world I found a passion for learning and understanding those different from myself. I hope to expand my learning and passion for travel by writing and working with people to collaborate and tell others peoples stories.