Embracing Liminal Identity : Uncovering Hidden Diversity : Celebrating Cultural Mobility

How Worldschooling Creates More Peaceful Citizens

We all see the world through different lenses, as is visible through the popular phrase, “to see the world through roses tinted glasses”. Lainie Liberti wrote an article about world views and seeing through different lenses in 2015 that brings a lot of insight to the way people see the world. (http://www.raisingmiro.com/2015/01/19/a-world-in-which-worldviews-world-schooling-intersect/) In her article, she writes that, “No information, lesson nor experience can be perceived outside of the perceiver, therefore the information, lessons and experiences run through our individual filters. We process knowledge and information through our unique worldviews which helps define how we function within the world.” Liberti talks about the need to step outside of our lenses and worldviews, and how important travel is in the process of doing so.

photo curtesy of Project World School

photo curtesy of Project World School

I am young; yet I have spent this past year traveling and learning. When I left the United States, I left with a very narrow view on the world. In the past year I have spent time in Mexico, Ecuador, the Netherlands and Peru. In each of these places success is different, stability is different, even the plumbing is different! For someone so used to the United States, it took adjustment, it took stepping outside of my own worldview and adapting to the cultures that I was in to find comfort in these differences.

A movement that I became well aquainted with in the past year that is growing in popularity is Worldschooling. Worldschooling is a form of education based on a nomadic lifestyle. Families are uprooting and taking their lives on the road, often time abandoning traditional schooling in favor of educating their children through travel. Museums teach history better than a textbook, language is better learned by playing on the streets, and science is easier to comprehend when you’re volunteering with the foundations. For these worldschoolers, life isn’t a constant vacation. They are constantly volunteering and working on furthering themselves and their children as global citizens. Currently the Worldschoolers Facebook group has over 18,000 members and is growing larger by the day. Settling down and learning about a culture for a month or two and then uprooting to starting again in a different part of the world is the normal for them. These children are raised to see the world through new lenses, to be peaceful global citizens wherever they are.

By: KMitchell

Katie is a traveler, self directed learner and lover of all things outdoors. She's a mac & cheese enthusiast and will spend hours researching sub cultures.