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VIDEO: Part I of III: Marriage equality around the world

Australian chief executives on Tuesday are calling on their country’s political leaders to support marriage equality.

Alan Joyce, the CEO of Australia’s airline Quantas, is openly gay and he has an opinion on marriage equality.

“The fact an openly gay man such as [myself] could be the head of one of the country’s “most iconic brands” reflected Australia’s already progressive nature,” said Joyce in the article from The Guardian.

Groom placing ring on husband's finger : Stock Photo

Marriage equality/Getty Images

Just like Australia, many other countries around the world are fighting for marriage equality within their borders.

Within the world, according to Huffington Post,

  • 78 countries still imprison people for identifying within the queer community
  • Five countries, including parts of Nigeria and Somalia, still put people to death under law for being queer.
  • 70 countries have introduced anti-discrimination laws.

 

Also, within the wake of the earthquake in Nepal, many of the citizens are learning from India by how to provide aid and assistance during this time.

In a Quartz article called “Something that India can learn from Nepal, India can learn how to provide human rights for its citizens. This is because Nepal is the only South Asian country where homosexuality is not criminalized.

It is said that when Nepal has a new constitution, they may legalize gay marriage.

 

Lastly, in Guam Governor Calvo is blocking marriage equality. If you are a legally married same-sex couple then the country’s government will not recognize you. This mainly applies to people in the military who are married and then travel to Guam’s airbase where their marriage is not recognized.

 

Within the realm of marriage equality, it is important to recognize how the citizens of the world view this issue.

From a TCK perspective in the video below, Kenady talks about her views on marriage equality, what her experiences in other countries such as Egypt and Malaysia have been and how the intersectionality of her TCK and LGBTQ+ identity defines her experiences.

 

 

By: Lia Conger

Born in America, Lia is aspiring towards her hopes and dreams at Colorado State University. Although most of her background is in America she is culturally blended with a Korean heritage. She finds a way of creative expression through photography and video editing. Besides sitting at home with her cat discovering new music, she studies Journalism with a minor in Spanish, works on-campus and explores her interest to be a DJ at the college radio station.